Durbanville, Western Cape, South Africa

From left to right: Heike (daughter-in-law), Rennie (son), Marizanne (daughter), Melissa (daughter-in-law), Jeandre (son), Ronelle & André

From left to right: Heike (daughter-in-law), Rennie (son), Marizanne (daughter), Melissa (daughter-in-law), Jeandre (son), Ronelle & André

THE family

Fourth generation Andre Brink and his wife Ronelle have been growing wine on Groot Phesantekraal since the late 1990s. They have recently been joined by their two sons: Arend Daniel Jacobus (Rennie) Brink has a degree in accounting from Stellenbosch University and is working on the business side of the farming operation while Jean Andre Jordaan (Jeandre) graduated with an agricultural degree recently and is managing the cattle, sheep and game. Sister Marizanne has recently completed her studies in Industrial Engineering and has commended her professional career.

the

family

Fourth generation Andre Brink and his wife Ronelle have been growing wine on Groot Phesantekraal since the late 1990s. They have recently been joined by their two sons: Arend Daniel Jacobus (Rennie) Brink has a degree in accounting from Stellenbosch University and is working on the business side of the farming operation while Jean Andre Jordaan (Jeandre) graduated with an agricultural degree recently and is managing the cattle, sheep and game. Sister Marizanne has recently completed her studies in Industrial Engineering and has commended her professional career.

 

The farm was developed further when the present fourth-generation owner, Andre Brink, together with his wife Ronelle, planted vineyards covering 50ha of its 840ha expanse.

The Brink family still live in the original manor house which dates back to 1720. The building was Victorianised in 1810 but the Brinks sensitively restored it in 2002, replacing the slate tiles with the traditional thatch.

The restoration revealed burnt roof beams indicating that the roof was originally thatched, but it probably burnt several times over the centuries.

An interesting discovery during restoration was the original water well located alongside the house. It is lined with stones from the Ijsselmeer in Holland, indicating that is was built during the Dutch occupation in the 18th century.

The other outbuildings on the farm, which also date back to the 18th century, have also been restored.

Surrounding the farmstead are rolling wheat fields and canola, meandering flocks of sheep and herds of cattle, and even a few buffalo, eland and springbok just to keep life interesting. It is a working farm in the true sense of the word, so listen out for the whirr of a tractor, and watch out for a combine harvester which might briefly hold up the traffic.

 

The farm was developed further when the present fourth-generation owner, Andre Brink, together with his wife Ronelle, planted vineyards covering 50ha of its 840ha expanse.

The Brink family still live in the original manor house which dates back to 1720. The building was Victorianised in 1810 but the Brinks sensitively restored it in 2002, replacing the slate tiles with the traditional thatch.

The restoration revealed burnt roof beams indicating that the roof was originally thatched, but it probably burnt several times over the centuries.

An interesting discovery during restoration was the original water well located alongside the house. It is lined with stones from the Ijsselmeer in Holland, indicating that is was built during the Dutch occupation in the 18th century.

The other outbuildings on the farm, which also date back to the 18th century, have also been restored.

Surrounding the farmstead are rolling wheat fields and canola, meandering flocks of sheep and herds of cattle, and even a few buffalo, eland and springbok just to keep life interesting. It is a working farm in the true sense of the word, so listen out for the whirr of a tractor, and watch out for a combine harvester which might briefly hold up the traffic.

more about our history

OUR HISTORY   |   ANNA DE KONING   |   BERLIET   |   WINE MAKING   |   WORKING FARM